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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
paul offers an immigration plan. >> there is no one reason we lost. our message was weak. our ground game was insufficient. we were not inclusive. >> the chairman of the republican committee. why did mitt romney lose in 2012? the republican national committee did some homework on the question. it was an autopsy that involves -- involved contacting more than 50,000 people. they did not need a study to tell them president obama owned the minority vote. charles, your reaction to the study? >> i would not have used the word "autopsy," as it applies to a corpse. we still have the gop, althought it is somewhat in a coma, but it will recover after eight years of liberalism. the one thing the rnc had to look at is what it did wrong. it should not be leading the party about ideas or ideology. that is the job of the leaders in the party and the candidates, but it should have done the nuts and bolts -- the outreach, the social media, the kind of ground game that obama had and republicans did not. it was lacking, and that is where it needs to recover, otherwise the game will be uneven from here
face as their teaching workforce is graying. economics correspondent paul solman was back on campus, part of his on-going reporting, "making sense of financial news." >> when my doctor or my wife tells me i ought to stop, i will stop. >> solman: 75-year-old former george washington university president stephen trachtenberg still teaches public service there. >> you guys are all working well togetherm and that's wonderful. >> solman: at george mason university, 71-year-old writing professor don gallehr is still teaching too. >> if the kids are happy and learning and i'm happy and learning, i'm here. >> solman: and how long does 69- year-old boston university particle physicist larry sulak plan to keep blowing up protons? >> i have no idea. shelly is a good model. >> solman: that would be his 80- year-old colleague, nobel- winning physicist sheldon glashow. and when do you intend to retire? >> that i don't know. >> solman: america's work force is graying, and academia along with it. professors over 65 have more than doubled since 2000. some 40% of all workers say they'll work past 65.
: next, surf's up for "newshour" economics correspondent paul solman. his subject tonight: how the monster waves of international trade and globalization threaten-- yes-- the surfboard industry here in the u.s. it's part of paul's on-going reporting "making sense of financial news." >> that's steve and barrie boehne, they're the leading force in tandem. look at the grace. >> reporter: now what, you may ask, could a surfing star of the 1970s have to do with economics in 2013? >> isn't that great! >> reporter: well, steve boehne's life in the surf, which began at age 12 here in dana point, california, has involved shredding the waves, since 1958, on boards of his own invention. he's the founder and still maker and seller of legendary high end infinity surfboards. >> paul, you can use my board any time. >> reporter: even if his heavy lifting days are over. isn't this kind of a large surfboard? >> yeah, this is bigger than normal. it's a standup surfboard. it's become popular in the last five years. and a lot of the older guys really embraced it at first, because it's a little bit
. the liberation of theology. cardinal -- had to deal with that because mainly john paul the second put it on his lap. >> rose: right. >> he's always been hurt to the church giving priority to the poor. >> rose: who is that. >> ratsinger. >> rose: pope benedict. >> exactly. this guy is from latin america. the church in america has made a commitment that has extended to the whole world which we start particularly start latin america which called the preferencionual option for the poor. i think his assignment is to show that works and it's not just piety. it means living and forming and working -- >> rose: you think he's more interested in those kinds of objectives, reaching out to the poor and making sure that the church serves the poor. than he is being so steadfast on some doctrinal issues. >> it depends -- divinity of christ. but anyway, yes. but i think it's what he would be concerned about is not just the prevention of the poor and the doctrine on the other specified but the link between the two. is there one. we have a double kind of life. >> rose: link between commitment to the poor an
on immigration i think a lot of things are happening. rand paul today came out for at least legal status for immigrants. so i think some people thought after this last election debalk backal will be pointing fingers and there's a lot of that going on. some of this stuff i think is productive for them now. putting a paper together the way actually doing some of this stuff. for instance it says we can't be a party of universal purity. yes we can all agree on that. it may be harder when they get to the caucuses. >> rose: are you watching or seeing each of the possible canned dates in 2016 staking out safety on particular issues like immigration and other points so that they want to make sure that they're in the cutting edge of where the party might be. or where the election might be. >> in some sense they're actually trying to lead that right wing base. i think rubio and to some extent paul on the question of immigration are trying to do that. i think it's too early to stake out any serious positioning. they're all doing everything they should do. they went to cpack. everyone who was invit
this, we david. we heard, among other things, rand paul talking about a completely new position for him on immigration. what's going on? >> well, the immigration story is just good news for those of us who want a comprehensive solution. whether it's the-- what's happening on immigration is we failed probably seven, eight years ago, but now it's just moving. and so there's a groom of eight senators in the senate who are working together to come up with a bill, and they've overcome what used to be the main hurdle which is how-- what are we going to do with the 11 or 12 million who are here. they have more or less got that. now they are arguing how we get the long-term flow of. so suddenly you're seeing progress, and that's in the senate. in the house, you're seeing some private meetings where they are making progress there, too, which is actually a harder job under the aegis of leadership of both parties. i think it's quite likely what we couldn't do a couple of years ago we're going to do this time which is have a exrepsive immigration reform bill and fix the system. >> woodruff: and a b
the middle east, starting with israel's new governing coalition sworn into office today. >> ifill: paul solman reports on older workers in academic institutions, professors in the classroom long past age 65. >> am i keeping track of jobs? yes. that's okay. as long as i'm a good teacher, that's what's important. >> woodruff: and we examine the republican national committee's call for a new direction for the g.o.p., a road map hoping for a rebound in 2016 and beyond. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, t
of the biggest developments of the week, the senator from kentucky, rand paul, gave a speech in which he didn't actually use the word citizenship for illegal immigrants but he implied that he is there. the first major figure from that side of the party to really come out and endorse this idea. >> when you think about the tea party, it was only a few months ago that after the president's state of the union address there was a republican party response, there was a tea party response. gave you a sense of how decided they were on these issues. can you see a merger in the next year or two that actually gets engineered that begins to neutralize this decision? and same-sex marriage will be up there in front of the supreme court next week, another one they've never quite sealed up on. >> i'm not sure the party did -- can do that. the only thing that could really bring these different sections together say person, a figure that they can sort of speak to all the strands of conservativism and republicanism that are out there. gwen: well, let's talk about a person, a figure. on the issue of gay marriage
compensated. my own government now nationalized a.i.g. >> rose: hank paul son and back to the terms of the deal you thought was so unfair was interviewed by me and this is what he said about the deal. hank paulson. >> there's no doubt in my mind that if a.i.g. had gone down armageddon. >> rose: because they're entwined? >> they're entwined, they're huge. tens of billions of guarantees for i.r.a.s and other retirement savings programs. once the loan was made, it was a fed loan, they had -- the authorities, they had the technical expertise to do the restructuring i knew nothing about it until announcements were made publicly. what i've said and i believe from the bottom of my heart is having worked with all of the people at the fed is closely as -- as closely as i have i just know what they were driven by and they were driven by protecting the system and protecting the american people. >> rose: i'm not questioning motives. this is not about motives. this is about looking back the benefit of 20/20 hindsight should there have been a different deal having to do with -- >> one of the thin
. republican senator rand paul put his support behind comprehensive immigration reform today. during a speech at the u.s. hispanic chamber of commerce, the kentucky republican said the nation's 11 million illegal immigrants should have a legal way to stay in the u.s. >> we will find a place for you. this cause, however, those who work for reform must understand that a real solution must ensure our borders are secure. we must also treat those who are here already with understanding and compassion without also unduly rewarding them for coming illegally. >> sreenivasan: bipartisan efforts are under way in both the house and senate to overhaul u.s. immigration laws. today speaker of the house john boehner called the house version a "pretty reasonable solution." the number of americans dying from alzheimer's disease has increased by 68% in the last decade. according to the alzheimer's association, one in three seniors have some form of dementia when they die, and the disease accelerates the progression of other life- threatening conditions. because alzheimer's has no cure or treatment to slow symp
there were people in the bushhi administration who thought that. i think paul wolf wit would have been a proponent of that, that you could create a democracy ino iraq and have a catalytic effect on the region. but, you know, before we go totally from one extreme to the other, that, you know, nothing-- that history has actually comeng to an end and nothing can change in iraq. you know, in the glass one-quarter full side, they had elections. the u.n. validated the results. they weren't fraudulent. they were a lot more honest than they were in afghanistan. they have a parliament. the council of representatives. they passed a budget recently. there is political life in iraq. it's--y. it's-- whatever malikis an authoritarian figure but he's nothing like a saddam by anybody's estimation. so i just-- while there are reasons to be concerned in iraq and reasons to worry about the future, i don't think we should paint an entirely dark picture. and i think if you asked iraqis you'd get different perspectives. if you asked the kurds, i think they're glad there was the invasion. they have more auto
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)